12:44, October 14 85 0

2017-10-14 12:44:04

 

Donald Trump spoke at a conference that promotes conversion therapy

Yesterday Donald Trump became the first president to speak at the Value Voters Summit, a conservative conference organized by the Family Research Council that features hate groups and other colorful members of the far-right. A booth set up by one of those groups promoted conversion therapy.

Parents and Friends of Ex-Gays and Gays (PFOX) attended the conference and had a booth and distributed pamphlets, Business Insider reports.

One of those pamphlets was about what to do if your child comes out as gay. It said that there are two types of gay people: “the struggler” and “the seeker.”

The struggler is “someone wrestling with unwanted feelings of sexual attraction for the same-sex,” and the seeker is “someone who has been, or currently, on the journey of overcoming unwanted same-sex attraction.” About the seekers, the pamphlet said, “They are the ‘ex-gay‘ — the person who at one time perhaps publicly identified as gay, but made a decision to change their life.”

Another pamphlet was about an ex-transgender person called “Darryl.” “Through fundraising efforts, PFOX raised enough money for Darryl to reclaim his masculinity by undergoing numerous surgeries to reverse his appearance as female,” the pamphlet read.

A paper distributed by PFOX told conference-goers that equal rights can turn kids trans. “Affirming gender dysphoria via public education and legal policies will confuse children and parents, leading more children to present to ‘gender clinics’ where they will be given puberty-blocking drugs,” the paper said.

The group also handed out buttons that said “Ex-Gay Is OK!” in Comic Sans.

But since PFOX didn’t say they wanted to “rid the Earth” of gay people, they were still not the most bigoted people at the event.


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