21:19, August 02 94 0

2017-08-02 21:19:05

 

Is it time for HRC to do away with the Corporate Equality Index?

There are unanswered questions following accusations posted to Facebook by the so-called First Lady of Bourbon that the company founded by her father, Tom Bulleit, has cut her out of the family business because of whom she loves.

As Queerty reported, heiress Hollis Bulleit revealed that the family has excluded her from gatherings ever since she came out as a lesbian nearly a decade ago. In January of this year, Bulleit claims she was squeezed out of the company altogether.

But was Bulleit Bourbon’s parent company, Diageo, kept in the dark about the alleged homophobia Bulleit claims she was required to conceal?

I should never have been put in a position to hide my family’s homophobia or my company’s complacency in order to keep my job. I did nothing wrong. I have nothing to be ashamed of. But the punishments, the silent treatments, and the threats continue.

What’s troubling is that Bulleit’s claim that she hid antigay attitudes at her family’s business is in stark contrast to the reputation of Bulleit Bourbon’s parent company. Diageo is the recipient of a perfect score on Human Rights Campaign‘s Corporate Equality Index. The liquor company boasts about its diverse workforce of 33-thousand employees and proudly notes it’s been awarded top honors by HRC nine years in a row. 

HRC declined to comment to LGBT Nation Wednesday. Spokespersons for Diageo and its media partner in the U.S. and U.K. did not respond to emails by press time, likely because the corporate headquarters in the U.K. was not open and the U.S. telephone number listed on its website was not in operation.

Bulleit told her friends and followers that her Kentucky-based family was not only shunning her and her partner Cher, but now was also “erasing” her from the company she stood to inherit someday: “I refuse to accept or be marginalized now or in the future.”

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Bulleit posted on Saturday that a photo of her at a groundbreaking was “symbolic of digging my own grave.”

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Then on Sunday, Bulleit shared a photograph of her embracing her partner on a dance floor, along with her most personal feelings, revealing that she “gave my life to my family and my brand but I also was expected to give up my dignity.”

In 2008, I was asked to come home for Christmas; yet Cher was not invited. The only holiday that we attended was Thanksgiving in 2016, and then we were promptly uninvited via text from the following core family Christmas. And because family was business and intertwined with a global corporation, I find it odd that I did not benefit from the departments and safeguards that are put into place to either intervene or provide mediation or educational diversity training as would be the expected protocol for employees in this type of situation. In light of my experience, I do not understand how the company I worked for is on many of the top 10/ 50/ 100 “best places” for LGBTIA employees to work.

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“I do not think people understand the extent that I have been possibly black balled and ostracized,” Bulleit wrote in another post Sunday, “and that I have to completely start anew.”


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